Gecko not eating.

_Lucian_

New Member
Messages
21
Location
Kentucky, US
A week ago I got a new Leo, and I'm starting to get a little worried, because he is not eating. This is my first Leo so be patient with me. I know it takes some time for them to adjust to new environments, but he's not leaving his hide at all, and still not eating. I've offered him mealworms, superworms, crickets, and even wax worms (I know they are not nutritious, just don't want him to starve) Any advise?

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Neon Aurora

New Member
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1,376
Location
New Mexico
That doesn't sound too abnormal, but we can check things out anyways. It would be helpful if you could describe your set up. Enclosure size, number of hides, temperatures, substrate, etc. What are you using for heat? What are you using to measure your temperatures?

Where did you get this gecko from?
 

_Lucian_

New Member
Messages
21
Location
Kentucky, US
That doesn't sound too abnormal, but we can check things out anyways. It would be helpful if you could describe your set up. Enclosure size, number of hides, temperatures, substrate, etc. What are you using for heat? What are you using to measure your temperatures?

Where did you get this gecko from?
He's currently in a 10gal (Which i know is a tad small, Im currently working on a new rack) He's got two hides, one warm, one cold/humid. His substrate is repti-carpet. For heat he has a under-cage heater, and his thermometer reads a ambient temp of 75-80. I got the gecko from a breeder on these forums.
 

Neon Aurora

New Member
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1,376
Location
New Mexico
A 10 gallon is fine for a single leopard gecko.

What kind of thermometer are you using? Ideally, you should have a digital one with a probe. The temperature on the floor where the UTH is should be around 90 F and on the cool should be no higher than 75. Improper temps can cause geckos not to eat.

If your temps are good, than I don't think you have anything to worry about. I've had geckos take over a month to start eating after I first got them.
 

_Lucian_

New Member
Messages
21
Location
Kentucky, US
A 10 gallon is fine for a single leopard gecko.

What kind of thermometer are you using? Ideally, you should have a digital one with a probe. The temperature on the floor where the UTH is should be around 90 F and on the cool should be no higher than 75. Improper temps can cause geckos not to eat.

If your temps are good, than I don't think you have anything to worry about. I've had geckos take over a month to start eating after I first got them.
Yea I know my setup isn't the best atm. But I am working on a rack system for him! I think he may just still be nervous, because I caught him out of his hide earlier, but he ran away as soon as he saw me. I hope he doesnt drop his tail from being scared of me x.x
 

Neon Aurora

New Member
Messages
1,376
Location
New Mexico
He's probably just getting used to things. You can start to worry for real if he hasn't eaten in over a month and is really dropping weight. Until then, try to get your temps correct and try not to handle him much (only necessary maintenance stuff).

He won't drop his tail unless you grab him by it and hang him in the air. Think about it this way; they store all of their fat in their tail. That is such a valuable resource to have, especially in the desert. The only reason they would be willing to lose something so valuable is if the alternative is dying. So if he can run away rather than drop his tail, that's what he will do. Now, if you were to snatch him up by his tail, he would think he is about to be eaten and could effectively escape by losing his tail and running away. So always pick him up by his body, and do so gently, and he will never drop his tail. I've never had one drop a tail and I've made booboos, like grabbing for a hatchling that is about to run off my hand. I will get the tail sometimes (better than letting the hatchling fall on the floor) but I'm always gentle and let go as soon as it is safe and I've never had a tail drop. It seems to take quite a bit to make them do it.
 

DrCarrotTail

Moderator
Messages
3,590
Location
Ridgewood, NJ
If he's coming out and exploring that's a good sign. I like to leave a little dish with 5-10 mealworms in the tank with all my new geckos. This way they can eat while nothing is moving about and scaring them and I can count the mealworms and check for poo to find out how much they're eating. Your setup sounds fine to me - I would just double check temps with a probe thermometer or IRT to make sure there's a 90 degree spot for your new guy and go from there. They really don't need elaborate set ups :) Good luck getting him to eat soon!
 

_Lucian_

New Member
Messages
21
Location
Kentucky, US
Okay its been a little over two weeks and he still has not eaten. He always has a warm spot. He's always got food available... I keep the hide misted. I don't know what to do. He just likes to bite me :|
 

Neon Aurora

New Member
Messages
1,376
Location
New Mexico
In what context is he biting you? If he isn't eating yet, it's best to leave him alone as much as possible.

Do you know what the breeder you got him from was feeding him? How is his weight?

Again, I have a gecko that refused to eat for over a month after I got him. He still doesn't eat much and is very picky, but he holds his weight alright. Geckos can be very individual in their eating habits.
 

_Lucian_

New Member
Messages
21
Location
Kentucky, US
In what context is he biting you? If he isn't eating yet, it's best to leave him alone as much as possible.

Do you know what the breeder you got him from was feeding him? How is his weight?

Again, I have a gecko that refused to eat for over a month after I got him. He still doesn't eat much and is very picky, but he holds his weight alright. Geckos can be very individual in their eating habits.
I actually got him to eat some dusted crickets right after posting this. The original breeder just fed him mealworms. But Im happy I got him to eat something.
 
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