I need a good Incubation strategy

Swaqqums

New Member
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11
I have tried two incubation strategies and both of them haven't worked and the eggs have molded. I have a hovabator incubator and I have been using perlite as the substrate. I have been incubating for females and the temperature is always running at 83 degrees Fahrenheit. I would like to know if you guys have used a incubation strategy that you have had great success with that you would be willing to share. At the moment I use 4 oz. Deli cups and I use 1 part perlite to 1 part water and I poke about 10 small holes in the top. It would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
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12,909
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Somerville, MA
Here's the definitive perlite incubation method: http://www.albeysreptiles.com/incubate-eggs.htm
Note that the perlite to water ratio is a little different. Also, don't put any holes in the egg boxes, rather, open them briefly (less than a minute) every week or so. Do you know whether the eggs you incubated are fertile? If not, it's not surprising that they will mold.

Aliza
 

Swaqqums

New Member
Messages
11
Hello acpart, this was my first time and I didn't put a flashlight up to the eggs but rather when one of them molded. When my female first layed they were extremely white and I went to the store and got some perlite and I poked holes in the top. The next time I incubate I will use 1 part perlite .8 part water with no holes in the top. Thank you.
 

acpart

Geck-cessories
Staff member
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12,909
Location
Somerville, MA
Let us know how it goes. You may find this article helpful (especially March):


Aliza
 

Geckoontherocks

New Member
Messages
6
I'm not sure how much help I can be but I used to breed western banded geckos. I've had pretty good success with using hatchrite. I'm sure it's just perlite with a fancy name. I've had about a 90% hatch rate any time I use it so I just pay the extra money for it incase it is somehow magical lol. I pour some inside a deli cup. I mist it about 4 to 6 times with a water sprayer (depending on the sprayer) and place the eggs in gently. I had about five 1/16th holes on the upper side of the cups. Too much water in the cups will invite mold. Lack of ventilation will cause mold too. An unfertized or unhealthy egg will also mold no matter what you do. You'll notice an egg needs more water/humidity when it starts denting inward. Always keep an eye on them for this reason. If so definitely mist some water in the cup. After a few batches you will just have a 6th sense for when to mist before the egg dents as you want to catch it right before then. I've tried using foot power on the mold but honestly eggs usually start molding when they just were not healthy to begin with. That said I believe I saved one once with wiping the mold off very gently with a damp Q-tip. His sibling was the dead one in the clutch and had to be removed but he did survive. It can be possible that only one of your eggs is causing the mold to spread to the other.

Anyways that is what has worked for me in the past. I actually have a female about to lay soon so I will be giving it a go again. There may be better ways.
 
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